Surf’s Up

I don’t plan on doing this regularly, but just wanted to give a quick heads-up about COVID numbers in the UK.

As you can see, we are well and truly into our second wave, with numbers now on a par with the initial wave. I’m using our government’s official source (as at 24/9) for these graphs, and the different colours you see represent the different countries of the UK. There is speculative talk in the media about a second wave happening in the future, if we’re not careful. I’d suggest that it’s here already, wouldn’t you?

Deaths, however, have not followed suit. There will be a lag between contracting the virus and death, so I am wondering whether we are just looking at that lag, although there was no great lag during the first wave. Time will tell, I suppose.

Locally, my area has very few cases, but that was always the case. If we do see a spike, it is a cluster of three or four people. I heard on the news tonight that Glasgow University alone was dealing with more than a hundred cases, so I think I’m getting off lightly.

Personally, I’m still as locked-down as I was back in March – it’s not so much being unable to go out, it’s more having no overriding reason to go out, and choosing to stay home.

I was prompted tonight because I looked at the numbers for Italy, whose government seems to have done a far better job of keeping a lid on this second wave.

Author: Mister Bump UK

Formerly Stroke Survivor UK. Designed/developed IT systems for banks, but had a stroke in 2016, aged 48. Returned to developing from home, plus do some voluntary work. Married, with a grown-up, left-home daughter.

12 thoughts on “Surf’s Up”

  1. I kind of expected it. Only because every September there is a surge in anything infectious whenever the kids go back to school. I think they have already shown that statistically younger people will have a mild case of corona (or even no symptoms at all)….but trying to get the education system back up and running and trying to get people back to work does mean that we have to be back on top alert again because it will allow virus to jump more easily. It has always been and still is the older and medically vulnerable that are most in danger. So, I think while they want education and work to be up and running, any other areas of people mingling I am sure they will want to limit until they see number lowering again.

    I don’t know…I am too tired to think about it right now. But I don’t envy them making these decisions. There will always be people who find the measures they are asking are a blow to them. We had a cousin get married recently, (I did not attend) but they were so glad they could have 30 people. Normally they would have had at least 100…probably closer to 200. So to have 30 was a victory to them. They were supposed to get married in May and had postponed it. but they did not want to wait any longer.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yeah, I follow Farida too, that was what prompted me to post. The only useful number to me is the daily “increment”. Keeping aggregate numbers makes for sensational news but is of limited use. I’m hopeful that, by now, the numbers are vaguely accurate here )now) but even we have headline stories about people not able to get tests. But yeah, I have heard other people say that the numbers coming out of the CDC are not good. Their site looked pretty slick when I looked, but of course that is no guarantee of accuracy.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. We have also a second spike in the numbers. It will continue and we will not know which wave we are in. Our government pushes the new normal and there are not that many restrictions in place, with the numbers on the rise. I’m curious what they will decide next when it all rises even more.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think the one thing we can take from this is how much thinking the individual must do for themselves. They can’t rely on the government to assess the risks for them.
      Not that I particularly mind doing that, personally, but I can imagine that a lot of people could use some help.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I agree. But I guess we all know that washing our hands, wearing a mask and especially keeping social distance is good for our health.
        Dance parties and bigger events are still forbidden, so there is some guidance.
        We can see 5 people each now, 5 people we can hug 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Even wearing a mask seems a bit nonsense around here, where there are no cases, but really, it is not exactly a hardship. I would guess that we are similar – I heard the number 6 talked about – but really it becomes irrelevant when I sit here with just one other.

          Liked by 1 person

  3. I have been following the british statistics on the BBC. It certainly does not look good, althugh on a very much smaller scale Swiss cases are also increasing. It depends very much on the area where you are. Geneva and the surrounding area have many new cases, our Kanton goes up and down, but not so bad. Our actual part of the Kanton have 1-2 two new cases daily. The overall graph is showing that the age groups of 70.80 have least cases and over 80 just a little more, but no great difference. Looks like I am now out of the woods, but you never know. Highest rate of infections seem to be the 20-30 age group. But Switzerland in its size and population is not really to be compared with Britain.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We are also hearing that the key agegroup is 20-30. I haven’t really paid too much attention to ages but that cold explain the lower death rate, just because people of that age tend to recover.
      Whilst the numbers might not be comparable, the curve for CH is broadly the same shape. One difference is that CH seems to have managed the second wave better than us. In that respect you’re similar to Italy.

      Like

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