Salisbury Visit

Mrs Bump happens to be off today and tomorrow. We usually have an online grocery delivery, but when she started to put our regular items in her basket, lots of them were showing “out of stock”. So, she suggested we go in person, to see for ourselves.

We ended up in Salisbury for lunch. When I first moved to this area, I was struck by the enormous town square in Salisbury, it reminded me of something European, a big place or platz. We lunched there today. Weather was bright and sunny, but not too warm, around 20C (which I think is 70F), and I took a few photos.

Incidentally, when we got to the supermarket (Tesco, the UK’s biggest), the situation was pretty consistent with their web site. We got the shop done, because we could look up and down the shelf and find alternates, but we saw lots and lots of gaps. The bread aisle, for example, was stocked only maybe 20%, and the situation as a whole was reminiscent of the start of the pandemic.

To give an example, muffins (I know, not an essential item) were stocking only two of the normal four varieties. These are items Tesco make on-site, so even the raw materials must be in short supply.

I’m at a loss to understand why this is – the media is reporting a shortage of truck drivers (to get goods from depots to stores) but the numbers can’t be down that much from a couple years ago, surely?

Author: Mister Bump UK

Designed/developed large IT systems, interrupted by a stroke in 2016, aged 48. Now mix development of health-related software with voluntary work and writing. Married, with a grown-up, left-home daughter.

15 thoughts on “Salisbury Visit”

  1. I haven’t been inside a grocery store for a few months since people here refuse to wear masks and increasing cases because if it, and gatherings by the thousands here the end of July with the state’s biggest money grab is during Cheyenne Frontier Days with rodeos and concerts. Since I’m considered compromised medically my fam won’t allow it either. Delivery online shopping is horrid and many regular items out of stock. Good luck as reading the news from UK in general says it’s getting worse. Here the general consensus is people don’t want to work. Personally, our whole family except me have and work jobs. It’s a necessity.🙂

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    Liked by 1 person

    1. I get the impression that most everybody is back here, although a lot of people now work from home. COVID cases have been up this last month or so, and although there are still deaths, they are much fewer.
      The one thing they do not report here is whether the deaths are of vaccinated or unvaccinated people. It seems obvious to me that if all the deaths were of unvaccinated people, they would shout this from the rooftops. It’s the biggest advertisement for vaccination that there could be.
      Which all leads me to believe that many of these deaths are people who have been vaccinated.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, it was lovely. It is kinda weird, though. Many of the shops – places that actually sell things – have gone, and the only people who seem to be doing well are the cafes. It’s kinda like the city centre has become some kind of leisure park.

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  2. I read some shipping and maritime newsletters and there are still large backlogs. Then too there always seems recently to be too many shipping containers in one port and a shortage in another. One report said that the problem would persist through the holiday season.
    In my area, New England, there does not appear to be mass shortages, and people are beginning to mask up again ( but not as fast as they should). I am assuming with the fires and drought in the west we’ll see shortages and high prices on fresh produce this fall. Nobody I talk to about it seems too concerned, which I think is an error.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. nothing particularly is being said here, either. Ditto, I think it is an error.
      At the start of the pandemic, shortages were blamed on panic buying, but I don’t really believe that. I think it was a scapegoat when actually, the supermarkets’ supply chains were far too fragile. And i think they have been bitten once again.

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    1. I must admit, I didn’t blame consumers at the start of COVID, and I don’t blame them now. I think supermarket supply chains have gotten far too fragile. They are some of the greediest businesses going.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Beautiful square. Easy to imagine sitting there and taking in an afternoon with a good book, journal, and cup of tea. There are gaps on shelves here as well. World seems to still be holding its breath and I wonder if they’ve forgotten how to breathe regularly.

    Liked by 1 person

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