Song Lyric Sunday (24 May 2020) – Termination

Last week, Jim (NewEpicAuthor, A Unique Title For Me) set a theme of togetherness (my selection). This week, he gives us the theme of termination.

One of the tunes I listened to from the Nineties this week.

I posted a while ago that I was pretty go-getting in the Nineties, I spent a lot of time in the car, driving to clients’ sites, generally building my business up.

I couldn’t help noticing Alanis Morrisette. To the kids of the nineties, they regarded her much the same as I regarded Tracy Chapman in te Eighties. A breath of fresh air. Everyone was raving about her, so I went out and bought her very first album, and do you know? it wasn’t at all bad.

In fact, it Jagged Little Pill was her third album, although the first to ever leave Canada, it made #1 not just in the UK and USA, but in a dozen other countries. It is often regarded as one of the best albums of all-time. and from it came a string of singles, including my choice today.

This one was released in September 1996. It reached #7 in the UK, but #1 on both the Billboard Adult Top 40, and the Billboard Mainstream Top 40, so hopefully you’ll recognise it. This was written by Morrisette in collaboration with Glen Ballard (who co-wrote many of the songs and produced the album), and is Head over Feet.

I had no choice but to hear you
You stated your case time and again
I thought about it

You treat me like I’m a princess
I’m not used to liking that
You ask how my day was

You’ve already won me over in spite of me
And don’t be alarmed if I fall head over feet
Don’t be surprised if I love you for all that you are
I couldn’t help it
It’s all your fault

Your love is thick and it swallowed me whole
You’re so much braver than I gave you credit for
That’s not lip service

You’ve already won me over in spite of me
And don’t be alarmed if I fall head over feet
Don’t be surprised if I love you for all that you are
I couldn’t help it
It’s all your fault

You are the bearer of unconditional things
You held your breath and the door for me
Thanks for your patience

You’re the best listener that I’ve ever met
You’re my best friend
Best friend with benefits
What took me so long

I’ve never felt this healthy before
I’ve never wanted something rational
I am aware now
I am aware now

You’ve already won me over in spite of me
And don’t be alarmed if I fall head over feet
Don’t be surprised if I love you for all that you are
I couldn’t help it
It’s all your fault

Alanis Morrisette, Glen Ballard

Tick Tock Tuesday Review (from 19 May 2020)

Last week I seized on an idea I’d picked up, to give a nod to the people who also shared some music under this banner. I have at least, thought of a better name this week. Calling it a “post mortem” wasn’t the brightest of ideas.

So, a nod to msjadeli, who presented a lovely, soothing piece, played by Acker Bilk, from another time. It really is so chilled, it is worth a listen.

A nod too to LindaKempWriter, who featured a Karen Carpenter song this week. Great minds think alike – I featured Karen Carpenter early on in my own series of posts (here) – the word “favourite” is overused but she’s certainly up there for me. So here you go, two great songs for the price of one!

Thanks, ladies. Lastly, I heard this one yesterday on the Seventies channel, and it has stayed with me ever since. So if you’re not all music’d out, enjoy this mellow tune:

Concert for George

Fandango’s Prompt today was photograph.

To be honest, my first thought was this song, but I presented a song the other day and I like to mix things up a bit.

I’m not a big fan of Ringo Starr, I know very little of his post-Beatles work. I found this track of his – which was co-written by George Harrison – when I heard it at the Concert for George, held on the first anniversary of George’s death.

I’m not a particularly sentimental person, but this is one of the few concerts I regret not having attended -instead I had to make do with watching the DVD, a few years later. I specifically thought of this version of the song, and you can find absolutely everything on YouTube, so I thought I might share it, if you fancy a listen. This entire clip is a long one because it covers both of Ringo’s contributions, but it was the first of them that rattled my cage.

If you don’t know it, the whole concert is worth a listen (but then I’m biased) – the first half covers the Indian music that George loved, the second covers some of his songs, performed by George’s pals, like Tom Petty and Eric Clapton. I was never a big fan of Joe Brown either but he plays a wonderful song on the uke.