Voting for Christmas

Prompt image for the Fandango's Flash Fiction prompt

For Fandango’s Flash Fiction Challenge #120, where we write about this image from Antenna at Unsplash. .

“He delivered us power. What more do we want? We probably wouldn’t be here if it weren’t for him.”

“Yes, but we got that power on the back of a load of promises, which are starting to unravel. We’re the party of small government and he’s promised handouts left, right and centre.”

“But he’s done it before, and the public forgave him. This guy’s like a rubber ball. Look at the letter boxes1, or at the runway2”.

“But there’s a difference between being a nobody and being PM. As PM, the buck stops there. He can’t just move on to the next project.”

“And what about COVID? He’s come out of that with glowing support. His ratings couldn’t be higher.”

“I wouldn’t make too much noise about COVID, if I were you. It’s only a matter of time before the public cottons on to us having the worst death rate in Europe.”

“Ah, Europe. See, there’s another thing. He dealt decisively with Brexit.”

“And got us, where? The deal nobody wanted? Shellfish rotting on quays because the customs delays prevent them getting to market?”

“Those were just teething troubles. If we’d have had time to prepare…”

“We *did* have time to prepare. He set the timetable, for god’s sake. There *was* time to prepare. Should have been, at any rate.”

The room was becoming restless, but the woman continued.

“And what about the debacle in Ireland? All that goodwill just evaporated.”

At this, there were cries of disbelief. None of them had ever considered the Irish as colleagues, in any case.

A minute later, the chairman brought the meeting back to order. “Ahem, it’s about time we pushed on to the vote. The motion is that the Prime Minister no longer has the confidence of the Conservative Party. All those in favour, please raise your hands.”

A single woman made a slight movement to raise her hand, then thought about where her next pay check would come from before she relaxed, hoping that nobody would notice.

1.

As a journalist, before his political career but certainly after maturity, Boris Johnson used his column to refer to burka-clad women as “letterboxes”.

2.

As a humble MP, whose constituency contains Heathrow Airport, there was a great deal of local opposition to building a third runway there. Johnson added his voice, claining that he would lie in front of the bulldozers if needs be.

Later, Johnson had been promoted to Foreign Secretary, and was suspiciously absent for the parliamentary vote.

The vote subsequently carried and a third runway there is planned.

Author: Mister Bump UK

Designed/developed large IT systems, interrupted by a stroke in 2016, aged 48. Now mix development of health-related software with voluntary work and writing. Married, with an estranged daughter.

8 thoughts on “Voting for Christmas”

  1. Haha. Yesterday a group of us were having a light-hearted conversation about the general public as a whole and Boris!

    We came to the conclusion that Boris is a showman who knows how to work his audience (the public) . We might not trust the likeable rogue , but generally most people don’t care about his misdemeanours.

    Cummings – no one likes him, no one believes a single word even if it’s true. Cummings is dismissed.

    Boris makes gaffes but no one cares, people have come to expect it – it’s just Boris and he makes people laugh.
    There’s just something about Boris!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes I think he’s a likeable chap, but fundamentally not very bright, As in, not in the same league as many of the people who’ll be working for him. And I think that as PM, there’s no place to hide.

      As for Cummins, there is the fundamental problem that he was part of the machine for so long, so if it was as bad as he says, why’d he stick around?
      In his testimony, it staggered me that he admitted to trying to thwart Hancock, because Hancock’s plan was so dumb. Dumb or not, Hancock was the elected politician, so it was not an advisor’s place to thwart him.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I agree with you.
        I’m certain the government made lots mistakes as did most governments, and equally I’m sure they said lots of dumb things in private.
        I think it’s time Matt Hancock learned to say We and less of the I. Saying We might not get him into as much trouble.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I’m sure that when the dust settles it will be a case of comparing the UK’s death rate with that of other nations. But I suspect by then that people will be so overjoyed to hve survived that all will have been forgiven.

          Liked by 1 person

            1. I mean, I don’t rate Starmer much either, but all he can hope to do is to say “We were x%. and such-and-such was only y%. Even then they can point to very poor data at the start.

              Like

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